Archive for the 'Mobile Etiquette' Category

Jared Benson and friend Andy texting

This week at SXSW (pronounced South by Southwest) Jared Benson, Executive Creative Director at Punchcut, will lead a conversation titled “Mobile Manners: Mobile Presence and the Undefined Etiquette.”

Left to our own devices, what happens to our manners? Jared will lead a discussion among user experience design practitioners in discussing the profound effects the always-on mobile lifestyle is having on the way we interact with people and the world. In the same old contexts, we have a whole new set of choices: Do I really have to take this? Should I just put my headphones in and pretend I can’t hear them? Instead of calling mom back, can I text her? The cues and standards for how we communicate on our devices in the presence of others are just beginning to be defined. For the most part, individuals - not social norms - are deciding what is appropriate.

This conversation will cover what the UE design community can do to empower the user and alleviate the fear that we are becoming isolated by our technologies. Punchcut will facilitate a discussion on contextual considerations, the formality of various mediums, and the demands of emerging ideas like mobile presence.

Join the conversation at SXSW on Sunday March 9th at 5pm in Ballroom E.

Listen to the podcast here:
mobile_etiquette.mp3

Joe Pemberton

Mobile etiquette: This post sent from my phone

Email sent from a desk does not equal email sent from a mobile device.

When you send an SMS text or chat message people understand the casual, quick nature of the medium, and therefore expect a level of casualness when it comes to spelling full words (u versus you, ppl versus people) and forming complete thoughts and sentences. Just as spoken language is conversational, chat and SMS afford a certain level of laxness.

Email has evolved. There was a time when typing in all lowercase (hopefully you never typed in all caps) was normal enough for email. But since it has become the mainstay of corporate communication, it has dressed up accordingly. Although emoticons occasionally find their way into corporate emails, cute misspellings and abbreviations don’t.

New etiquette is needfully emerging. How do recipients know you’re sending an email from a device versus your desktop? When I’m writing a note via email from a mobile device, to a work colleague, must I type in complete thoughts and sentences? Must I capitalize and punctuate?

When I first saw Apple’s “Sent from my iPhone” default signature I thought it just let me show off my cool quotient with an iPhone reference. What they really did was create a disclaimer: forgive the typos and the informality.

(I thought about actually posting this from my phone, but blogging requires a certain level of formality that I wasn’t prepared to take on with a mobile device. That would be more appropriate for my microblog.)

Social networking and mobile communities

Today at the EuroIA Summit, Barcelona, we will discuss insights from the Punchcut-funded mobile social networking study.

The poster lists the chief insights and provides a visualization of the users ages and their behaviors (text messaging, IM, email, photo sharing, blogging, commenting both using desktop apps and mobile devices).
Continue Reading »

Jared Benson

Don’t be That Phone Guy

In the spirit of mobile social etiquette, I offer up these clips. If you’ve not seen them, Merlin Mann from 43 Folders fame plays “That Phone Guy,” that loud speaking, jargon-using, obnoxious mobile user that we sometimes find ourselves stuck next to in line.

Still on the Ground | Literally | Don’t run DOS | Okay | Dots of Fluid

Mind Waffle | Foot Tattoo | Hearing Huey Lewis

A Dungaree | Salon-perfect | A Pulsing Sting | Is that how you get a pony?

[ Watch more at thatphoneguy.com. ]